Protecting People and Infrastructure for
200 Years
Rich heritage since 1824, Hill & Smith is a testament to British manufacturing and resilience.
From our home in the Black Country, along the highways of the UK, to the far corners of the world… our legacy blends innovation and sustainability, crafting solutions that protect people and infrastructure.

From Royal beginnings...

In 1860, we supplied miles of fencing for Queen Victoria’s estate, followed by another royal engagement in 1900 for King Chulalongkorn of Siam.
In 1860, we supplied miles of fencing for Queen Victoria’s estate, followed by another royal engagement in 1900 for King Chulalongkorn of Siam.
We’re committed to net zero, always finding ways to lower our carbon footprint. In 2023, we launched Rebloc LC… our low-carbon concrete barrier range.

...to a greener future

We’re committed to net zero, always finding ways to lower our carbon footprint. In 2023, we launched Rebloc LC… our low-carbon concrete barrier range.
Explore Hill & Smith's heritage, innovation and drive for sustainability.
Find out more

Discover 200 years of heritage

1800s
1900 - 1925
1925 - 1950
1950 - 1975
1975 - 2000
2000+

Dates in History

1840s
The Black Country gained its name in the 1840s from the smoke from the many ironworking foundries and forges. Other theories mention the abundance of the shallow, 30ft thick seams of coal in the region.
1863
The iron industry grew during the 19th century, peaking around 1850–1860. In 1863, there were 200 blast furnaces in the Black Country. Two years later it was recorded that there were 2,116 puddling furnaces, which converted pig-iron into wrought iron.
1882
Bessemer-style steel works were constructed at Spring Vale in Bilston by the Staffordshire Steel and Ingot Iron Company, a development followed by the construction of an open-hearth steelworks at the Round Oak works of the Earl of Dudley in Brierley Hill, which produced its first steel in 1894.

Dates in History

1900
By Victorian times, the Black Country was one of the most heavily industrialised areas in Britain, and it became known for its pollution, particularly from iron and coal industries and their many associated smaller businesses. Industrialisation led to the expansion of local railways and coal mine lines.
1912
The anchors and chains for the ill-fated liner RMS Titanic were made in the Black Country at Netherton. Three anchors and accompanying chains were manufactured; and the set weighed in at 100 tons. The centre anchor alone weighed 12 tons and was pulled through Netherton on its journey to the ship by 20 Shire horses.

Dates in History

1968
The 20th century saw a decline in coal mining in the Black Country, with the last colliery in the region – Baggeridge Colliery near Sedgley – closing on 2 March 1968, marking the end of an era after some 300 years of mass coal mining in the region.

Dates in History

2009
The Black Country has seen the adoption of symbols and emblems with which to represent itself. The first of these to be registered was the Black Country tartan in 2009, designed by Philip Tibbetts from Halesowen.
2012
In 2008 the idea of a flag for the region was first raised. After four years of campaigning a competition was successfully organised with the Black Country Living Museum. This resulted in the adoption of the Flag of the Black Country as designed by Gracie Sheppard of Redhill School in Stourbridge and was registered with the Flag Institute.
1882
Bessemer-style steel works were constructed at Spring Vale in Bilston by the Staffordshire Steel and Ingot Iron Company, a development followed by the construction of an open-hearth steelworks at the Round Oak works of the Earl of Dudley in Brierley Hill, which produced its first steel in 1894.